JYL1510R

The Sewing Machine Factory-JYL-1510R computerized industrial cap stitched machine

Although sewing machines from the earliest makers have survived, I have come across little pictorial evidence of the factories in which they were made. This is a pity as some important manufacturing techniques were pioneered by the sewing machine industry.
The problems of mass production were initially solved by the small arms industry in the USA at the time of the civil war.
From the Colt armoury in Hartford Connecticut came Charles E. Billings and Christopher M. Spencer. Billings had founded the Weed Sewing Machine Co. with George A. Fairfield in Hartford. While with Billings, Spencer devised his automatic turret lathe with “brain wheels” (Fig. 1) which revolutionised the series production of small precision parts. The first parts which Spencer produced were small bobbins for Billings’ sewing machines.
Singer, though one of the major early manufacturers, was not in the forefront of using the new automatic machine tools. Much work was hand fitted and major items were contracted out. The James’ St. factory in Glasgow, for instance, bought in castings from George Ure’s foundry in Bonnybridge and cabinets were imported in pieces from Southbend, Indiana.
Only when the company moved to Kilbowie in 1884 was every part of the machine, including tooling, made on the one site. Sewing machine factories were major employers of labour with Kilbowie employing over 14,000 workers in its heyday around 1906 when it manufactured over a million machines each year.
Photographs and engravings of the exteriors of factory buildings are much more common than pictures of the people at work in the interior. When engravers depicted interiors they usually cleaned them up to show specific trades at work. Figure 2 is an engravings of the Singer Elizabethport NJ forge in the 1880’s.
The forge could be any large engineering works with its steam hammer and forest of belting driving machines. Ornamenting the machines required much hand labour . The needle department often had women working in an engineering environment, not so common in the nineteenth century.
For some photographs I have taken examples from a set of 40 stereo pairs of pictures of the National Sewing Machine Co.’s factory at Belvidere Ill. USA about 1920.
They show scenes which were probably unchanged from about 1890 to almost 1950 in some plants. (When Singer ceased production at Kilbowie (Clydebank) in the 1970’s there were still machines in use that had been installed for the opening in 1884!) A general history of the National S. M. Co. is given in Graham Forsdyke’s article in ISMACS News 55. The factory was driven from a steam powered central engine house by a forest of shafting and leather belts.
The only automatic machine tools seen are for making small screws. There is little evidence for health and safety measures and only two photographs show inspection or quality control. At the end machines are shown in crates being loaded onto railroad freight cars. I was surprised to see the treadles assembled and not as “flatpacks”.

If you want to learn more detail about sewing machine,welcome to visit our website:https://jylmachine.com/
Our contact window as below:
Guangdong JinYueLai Automation Equipment Co., Ltd.
Address: NO.13 ChangPing Commercial Street,Daojiao Town Dongguan City GuangDong Province,China
Tel:(86)0769-82909969
Fax:(86)0769-81220406
Mobile:+86 18922964048
Email:ywwx5@chinajinyuelai.cn
ywwx6@chinajinyuelai.cn
ywwx7@chinajinyuelai.cn
kingrally@163.com

JYL-A5-2

The Invention of the Sewing Machine,An Alternative History-JYL A5-2 CNC two working stations Punching holes Machine

‘Alternative history’ is rather popular at present with authors trying to rewrite the documented history of events. To show that this is not new, here is an ‘alternative history’ of Howe’s invention of the sewing machine culled from the July 1865 issue of the Child’s Companion and Juvenile Instructor, price one penny and published by The Religious Tract Society. Here is a moral story for little girls written in Elias Howe’s lifetime!

Our little girls must learn to use the needle, and hem, and sew, and make button holes, in spite of sewing-machines; for I have not heard whether sewing-machines can darn or patch, or do all the work that is to be done. So our daughters must learn to use the needle for these useful exercises; otherwise, they may have to go with a hole in their stockings, or a torn dress.

They say the needle has killed more people than the sword. Can that be so, I ask, looking at our children so happy over their patchwork? To find out whether this is true, let us look into the dark garrets and back alleys of the great cities. There should we find hundreds and thousands of poor, pale, sickly women, trying to earn their living by their needle. Some of them have dear little children to feed and clothe; and, in order to do this, they have to sit and sew sixteen hours a day, and perhaps get only a few pence for all their toil. It is only “stitch, stitch, stitch,” from morning till night, day after day, with very little bread to eat even then. No wonder they die of it. So the needle has killed a great many people, I have no doubt. I cannot tell you how grieved some kind people were when they first heard of this sad state of things. They used to form societies to help these poor women; but societies could not stop the difficulties.

At last a strange little friend came to their help. And what should it be but a sewing-machine! While the poor London sewing women were starving to death, a man in America, seeing how many stitches his poor wife had to make for her little family, wondered if he could not make a machine to do her sewing. He puzzled his brains a good deal about it. In the evening, after he came home from his day’s work, he took his tools, and put his ideas into wood, and into iron, and wheels; and out of it all, sure enough, came a machine that could use a needle. That pleased his wife. The man’s name is Elias Howe. He showed it to some of his friends, who said “it was capital. Get the invention patented, Elias.” And Elias did. That was in 1846.

All the sewing machines which we hear of sprung from that. Improvements of course have been made; and now a machine in full working order can not only sew, but turn down a hem, put on a binding, plait a flounce, and sew it on better and quicker than the most expert needlewoman.

Many women at first were put out of work by the sewing-machine, but others were helped into work by it. In the end it will, no doubt, work for the good of all classes. Thus we see how new inventions turn out in the end to the good of mankind.

If you want to learn more detail about sewing machine,welcome to visit our website:https://jylmachine.com/
Our contact window as below:

Guangdong JinYueLai Automation Equipment Co., Ltd.
Address: NO.13 ChangPing Commercial Street,Daojiao Town Dongguan City GuangDong Province,China
Tel:(86)0769-82909969
Fax:(86)0769-81220406
Mobile:+86 18922964048
Email:ywwx5@chinajinyuelai.cn
ywwx6@chinajinyuelai.cn
ywwx7@chinajinyuelai.cn
kingrally@163.com

en元旦快乐2

HAPPY NEW YEAR 2019

Goodbye 2018, welcome 2019, the new year, JinYueLai to join hands with you!New Year’s New Meteorology, in the new year, Jinyue will create brilliance with partners, customers and friends with better service, better quality products, more advanced and intelligent new products.

Here, JinYueLai comes to wish you all a happy New Year, good health and happiness!
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TH-G2516SM

The Pinking Machine-TH-G2516SM-Computerized pattern sewing machine

“Pinking” is the name given to producing scalloped or zig-zag edges to cloth for decorative purposes or to prevent fraying. Nowadays it is usually done with ‘pinking shears” (Figure 1), a pair of special scissors. For the serious dressmaker, specialised machines have long been available to produce a variety of uniform fancy edges. Here are a couple of variants and the edges they produce (Figure 2). I would be interested in pictures and details of others, so send them to ISMACS News.
The first is an American machine, the ‘Hannum Pinking Machine” patented 110 years ago on November 2nd 1897 (Figure 3).

A sharp wheel cutter with a wavy edge (Figure 4) rolls against an upper wheel. Both cutter and upper wheel are hardened steel and the pressure between them is controlled by a screw. When cloth is fed between the wheels the edge is cut in the pattern of the cutter wheel. The ‘Hannum” machine was made by H. A. Hannum & Co., Syracuse, NY and must have been a success as an improved version called ‘The Gem” (Figure 5) was patented in America on April 25th 1899 and subsequently in Canada, England, France, Belgium, Italy and Russia between that date and 1903. The principal improvement is the ability to change the cutter wheels.

In a later American machine, the ‘Chandler HP2″ (Figure 6) the two wheels are reversed, the wavy cutter wheel is on top, and is driven through gears to keep the sense of rotation the same. A spring regulates the pressure between the wheels. This machine produces the ordinary zig-zag to prevent fraying (Figure 7).

The machine in Figure 6 is similar to the design shown in an English trade catalogue of 1930 (Figure 8).

sewing machine

How a Sewing Machine Forms Stitches-TH-G6080-Computerized pattern sewing machine

Sewing machines are of two classes – those for domestic use, usually driven by treadle or hand, and machines of special construction, driven by power, for use in the various industries. The principle upon which the machine works is the same as in all types: the needle is clamped to a bar or arm which moves vertically up and down at great speed, piercing the material to be stitched, which is placed upon a flat or curved steel plate. The needle is made with the eye near the point, the eye passing through the material, which is moved automatically for a small distance at a time, to form the stitch. Two kinds of stitches are chiefly in use–the single-thread or chain stitch, which can be unravelled by pulling the end of the thread, and the double-thread or lock stitch, in which an upper and lower thread are used, locking together in the centre of the material; this stitch cannot be unravelled, but must be cut through if the material is to be taken apart.

The operation of the chain-stitch machine is as follows: The needle descends through the material and throws out a loop of thread, which is seized underneath and held by a hook-shaped piece of steel called a looper, which has a vibrating or rotating movement. The needle then rises, and as soon as it is clear of the material this is moved forward the given length of the stitch. The looper then spreads the loop of thread across the path of the needle; this descends again through the loop, which slips off the looper and is drawn tightly up to the under side of the material. The needle next throws out a new loop, which is seized by the looper, and the operation proceeds as before. The appearance of the stitch is as a straight line on the upper surface, and as a series of interlocked loops on the under side.

The operation of the lock-stitch machine is as follows: The needle descends and throws out a loop as before; through the loop a second thread is passed by a vibrating shuttle, or the loop is passed over the under spool of thread by a steel circular hook having a rotating movement. When the needle rises, the second thread is drawn tightly up to the under side of the material, and the two threads interlock together in the centre. To facilitate the formation of the loop, and to permit the under thread to be passed through it, the needle is made to pause for an instant, and descend again in the up-stroke just after is has commenced to rise. The upper thread, after leaving the spool, which is carried as a pin fixed to the upper part of the machine, is passed between steel plates pressed together by an adjustable spring. The arrangement is termed the tension, and its object is to put a strain upon the thread, and consequently determine the tightness of the stitch; it then passes through a slot or hole in the upper end of the needle-bar to the eye of the needle. The stitch is drawn tight by the rising of the needle; and, as the thread would be left slack on the downward movement, a vibrating arm is provided, termed the automatic take-up, which engages the thread and draws it tight, releasing it at the moment of formation of the loop and at the end of the needle up-stroke. The lower thread is wound on a bobbin carried within the shuttle or rotating hook, and also provided with tension arrangement.

The material is kept from rising with the needle by the presser foot, a forked plate of steel carried at the end of a bar parallel with the needle-bar, and pressed down by a spring which is adjustable. The material is carried forward during the stitching operation by a small toothed bar or ‘feed-dog,’ which rises through a slot in the cloth plate underneath the presser foot, engages with the cloth, forces it forward the length of the stitch, then falls below the cloth plate, and moving back rises again and repeats the operation. With lock-stitch machines the stitch should have the same appearance on both sides of the cloth. Various attachments are provided for hemming, cording, braiding, ruffling, tucking, quilting, embroidering and tambour work can also be executed.

TH-G5050

Sewing Machine Attachment Tins-TH-G5050-Computerized Pattern Sewing Machine

Many collectors of sewing machines also collect other items associated with sewing machines – oil cans, oil bottles, Singer puzzle boxes or sometimes almost anything connected
with Singer. (We have three Singer stools in our house, but that’s another story).

However, I felt I had to show the Pfaff Zwerge or dwarf tin which is quite well known and very collectable. It dates from about 1906 and must be the only tin with the artist’s
signature on the front.

Two interesting and attractive tins came from Biesolt & Locke who started making sewing machines in 1869 in Meissen and in 1893 made the Afrana rotary. Eventually all their
machines were called Afrana and Seidel & Naumann continued with the name after buying up the rights in 1918. The odd thing is that both the Biesolt & Locke and the Afrana tins
have mirrors on the inside of the lid. Why? Perhaps it was to reflect the gaslight and help the search for a small attachment or needle? Anyway it didn’t seem to catch on.

Many tins have lithographed pictures of the company’s factory on them, sometimes in monochrome on the inside of the lid, or in colour on the outside as with the Original Victoria,
from Mundlos of Magdeburg.

There is considerable detail in these drawings if they are enlarged.

One other group of tins that are attractive and collectable are known as ‘handbag’ ‘casket’, or ‘Kästchen’ tins. These were for the Original Victoria, from Mundlos of Magdeburg
and for Seidel & Naumann machines from Dresden.

There are several different versions of these and also French and Italian versions as well as German. I know of at least one more version of the Original Victoria that I don’t
have yet.

Some dates can be estimated by medals shown on the tins. Although, like patent dates on sewing machine plates, the dates will only indicate that the tin must have been produced
after the latest date shown, it would be reasonable to assume that it would not have continued to be made much later than the date of other awards shown on other tins.

e.g., one Original Victoria tin shows off “Goldene Medaillen” won at Tasmania and Lubeck in 1892 and 1895; another shows these plus awards from Petersburg and Magdeburg in 1904
and a third lists these awards together with others dated 1905.

TH-G2010

The Sewing Machine Factory-TH-G2010-Computerized Pattern Sewing Machine

Although sewing machines from the earliest makers have survived, I have come across little pictorial evidence of the factories in which they
were made. This is a pity as some important manufacturing techniques were pioneered by the sewing machine industry.

The problems of mass production were initially solved by the small arms industry in the USA at the time of the civil war.
From the Colt armoury in Hartford Connecticut came Charles E. Billings and Christopher M. Spencer. Billings had founded the Weed Sewing
Machine Co. with George A. Fairfield in Hartford. While with Billings, Spencer devised his automatic turret lathe with “brain wheels” (Fig.
1) which revolutionised the series production of small precision parts. The first parts which Spencer produced were small bobbins for Billings’ sewing machines.

Singer, though one of the major early manufacturers, was not in the forefront of using the new automatic machine tools. Much work was hand
fitted and major items were contracted out. The James’ St. factory in Glasgow, for instance, bought in castings from George Ure’s foundry in
Bonnybridge and cabinets were imported in pieces from Southbend, Indiana.

Only when the company moved to Kilbowie in 1884 was every part of the machine, including tooling, made on the one site. Sewing machine
factories were major employers of labour with Kilbowie employing over 14,000 workers in its heyday around 1906 when it manufactured over a
million machines each year.

Photographs and engravings of the exteriors of factory buildings are much more common than pictures of the people at work in the interior.
When engravers depicted interiors they usually cleaned them up to show specific trades at work. Figure 2 is an engravings of the Singer
Elizabethport NJ forge in the 1880’s.

The forge could be any large engineering works with its steam hammer and forest of belting driving machines. Ornamenting the machines
required much hand labour . The needle department often had women working in an engineering environment, not so common in the nineteenth
century.

For some photographs I have taken examples from a set of 40 stereo pairs of pictures of the National Sewing Machine Co.’s factory at
Belvidere Ill. USA about 1920.

They show scenes which were probably unchanged from about 1890 to almost 1950 in some plants. (When Singer ceased production at Kilbowie
(Clydebank) in the 1970’s there were still machines in use that had been installed for the opening in 1884!) A general history of the
National S. M. Co. is given in Graham Forsdyke’s article in ISMACS News 55. The factory was driven from a steam powered central engine house
by a forest of shafting and leather belts.
The only automatic machine tools seen are for making small screws. There is little evidence for health and safety measures and only two
photographs show inspection or quality control. At the end machines are shown in crates being loaded onto railroad freight cars. I was
surprised to see the treadles assembled and not as “flatpacks”.

Computerized pattern sewing machine

Slave Girls in the sewing-machine industry(Part2)-TH-G2516-Computerized pattern sewing machine

Sure enough, there was the poor girl sitting in the dirty place, her head resting against a folded apron, breathing the foul air which reeked with filth and disease.

” The walls of the closet were black with pencil marks, the floor was strewn with lint and threads and the pale face of the sleeper looked ghastly in the darkness.”

” She was awakened and found to be sick. We helped her to a window where a place was found for her. We rubbed her temples, chuffed her hands, bathed her head and later, as I sewed away at my buttonholes, she told me her story.”

” Rose and I are only six months in this country. We came from England with our brother and live on Carpenter Street.”

” The climate doesn’t agree with me and I am sick all the time.”

” At first we worked at Marshalls Fields and Rose and I made fringe. We got $7 a week and were so happy.”

“It was awfully nice there. We didn’t have to pay for drinking water or anything like here. There were lots of towels, whole cakes of soap, and it was also clean.”

” We had a foreman over us and he was as good as a brother. Sometimes we let our money lay and drew it in a pile, oh such a lot it was.”

” We put away very much of it, but I got sick and all we’d saved went for doctor and medicine.”

” Then the work stopped. They took our names, though, and promised to send for us in the Fall. For a while we worked at the box factory but had we stayed it would have been to starve.”

” Then we went to Ellingers and made cloaks at 30 cents each but it was so hard and we couldn’t please them no matter how hard we tried. We came here today, but it’s only a fit place to starve in. All the work they gave me was a dozen jerseys to button. That’s 11 cents a row. I had two dozen holes to finish at 16 cents. 27 cents for the two of us, how can we live on it? And the child began to cry again.”

” After meeting this girl our authoress, who had been paid 5 cents for finishing black jerseys, went to the company shop and asked to buy one. it was offered to her for $2. “

computerized pattern sewing machine

Slave Girls in the sewing-machine industry(Part1)-TH-G3020-Computerized pattern sewing machine

WHILE MANY journals and worthy organizations decried the sweated labor used in the sewing-machine industry in the 1880s, the Chicago Times went one step further into its investigation of the state of those who worked in the garment industry.

Under the heading “city slave girls” the Times ran for several weeks a series of stories which were said to make its readers “flesh creep and their souls grow hot with indignation against the heartless vultures in human form who are grinding the flesh and blood of women and girls into grists for their own enrichment.”

The newspaper justified its investigation in these emotive words:

” The old oft-quoted Song of the Shirt once filled the world with horror at the cruel condition of the pauper labor of its day, but the songs of the cloaks, the jerseys, the coats, the vests, the trousers and the many other articles which are in these days chanting their own laments of exquisite suffering and woe constitute a chorus that overwhelms into insignificance the dubious wail of the old, sad song”.

What the Times did was in the best traditions of crusading, investigative journalism obviously a fore-runner of the Washington Post’s Watergate exposure.

It sent out a lady reporter in the garb of a poverty-stricken working girl to get work in both high-tone establishments and in sweating dens. She also interviewed all the workers that she could approach and then wrote of what she had seen and heard in a graphic style that “raised the hairs of the vampires who are waxing fat on human lives”.

The lady reporter whose pen name was Nell Nelson was an accomplished needle worker, but was said to be sadly deficient in the skill required to handle a power-run sewing machine. In one of her graphic pen pictures of a sweating shop she tells of meeting a recently-immigrated English girl. One story in the long series ran thus:

” Someone passed the news that a girl was asleep in the lavatory which was formed by a simple board partition at one end of the room.

JYL-G6030R2

Great Exhibition(Part2)-JYL-G6030-JYL brand sewing machine your first choice

The exhibitors were Biesolt & Locke from Meissen, Germany, who showed some 20 Singer look-a-like machines, and an interesting-sounding Cinderella where the handle was fitted to the front of the machine rather than at the side.

Domestic showed its range of family machines and Howe showed its new F model.

Pfaff machines were exhibited in England for the first time, and received an enthusiastic mention from the Gazette’s reporter.

The Vertical-Feed Sewing Machine Company was said to have had one of the best positions in the display and White’s Peerless attracted the writer’s attention “as a good specimen of sewing mechanism”. The Automatic Machine Syndicate of Walbrook exhibited its Unicum buttonhole machine.

The Gazette had nothing but derogatory remarks to make about the cheap end of the market, even discounting the manufacturers from its list of exhibitors.

“We are forced to the conclusion that cheap machines have no future before them. Certainly they are sold at such low prices as do not allow dealers to sell them on the hire-purchase system.

“The cheap manufacturers do not appear to know that it costs more to sell a machine than to make one, and that the prices they sell their goods at render a permanent business next to impossible.” But the Westminster Aquarium exhibition did give several of these manufacturers an opportunity to show their goods to the public.

Among those noted by the Gazette was the Dorman at 15 shillings, the Tottie, a chain-stitch model which sold at 3s 6d, the Stuart made of Victorian silver at 21 shillings. Hugo Sommerville of Long Lane, London, showed three small machines: the Flora which sold at 10s 6d, the Dorothy at twice as much and the Victoria at 31s 6d.

The article ended: “Several well-known travelers spent the exhibition fortnight in London, thereby giving the dealers a short respite. One of these …. said that his hope of meeting at the Aquarium a large number of visitors from the provinces was not realized. He estimated the number of dealers visiting the exhibition at between 12 and 14”.